The big miners have won their fight against the emissions trading floor, and now ... the resources tax... They saved themselves $1.5 billion over the first two years - and probably a lot more in later years - for the price of an advertising campaign estimated to have cost just $7 million. They prove that if you're big enough, rich enough and aggressive enough you can push the elected government of Australia around. Ross Gittins, July 3, 2010

Latest Papers

The working papers collection comprises historical papers as well as current ideas and works in progress on some of the major issues and topics of our times.

Chronology of Australian Aboriginal and European Relations 1770-2008 (released 13 November 2008)
A work in progress first published in Polity, Capability, Culture (2007). Updated here by popular demand. Free to people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent.
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“Change Robed in Justice” - Australia’s Indigenous National Leader Emerges (released 6 November 2008)
It was not the honour of the Sydney Peace Prize that conferred the status of 'national leader' on Patrick Dodson, the platform simply gave him the opportunity to demonstrate his mantle. Like the vibration of the yidaki around the islands of the Arafura sea - his speech rang out. (the Full Transcript along with a commentary below)
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Obama v McCain - Who Will Win, Does it Matter? (released 19 September 2008)
Ambassador Derek Shearer's brilliant analysis of the coming US Presidential Race, a public lecture of the University of Melbourne hosted by Vice Chancellor Glyn Davis.
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The Importance of Business for the Next Phase of Indigenous Development (released 19 September 2008)
Gerhardt Pearson told a National Australia Bank luncheon in Melbourne, 17 Sept, that his father had to get permission from the government to make a withdrawal from his bank account. The coming period will be an era of independent Indigenous economic development and wealth creation and the business community's role is all important.
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The Next Era of Social Enterprise (released 13 September 2008)
Collection of papers and speeches associated with Lord Mawson's "Board Room" and "Church Hall" visit to Australia in Sept 2008. This includes a 36 min, unedited, sound extract of his illuminating 2 hour discussion with Noel Pearson in the Daintree Raiinforest that is part of a forthcoming video documentary.
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Beyond CDEP - Professor Marcia Langton (released 22 August 2008)
Marcia Langton has become one of the most powerful orators in Australia. After three decades of working, researching and advocating for Indigenous Australians, her off-the-cuff speeches are to be treasured. In this speech, given without notes at the recent GARMA Festival of Traditional Culture, Marcia outlines her vision of a post-CDEP world for Indigenous Australia.
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50000 Jobs - Can it Be Done? (released 18 August 2008)
Entrepreneur and friend of Indigenous Australia Micko O'Byrne was put on the spot to talk about the Andrew Forrest initiative of creating 50,000 Indigenous jobs at the recent GARMA festival. He was initially sceptical but he came around to the importance of setting a goal and trying to achieve it. His ideas and the way he spoke were well received by supporters and critics alike.
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Letter from Australia (May-July 2008) Credibility (released 28 July 2008)
As Gordon Brown and the Tony Blair legacy fall apart in the UK; as the Democrats turn away from the trusted Clinton team to take a chance on a new young man; as tremors run through the world’s financial markets and as Australians begin to question whether Kevin Rudd has that X factor which defines leadership - after only six months in the job - our theme in this Letter from Australia is credibility. We also pay tribute to the great Australian broadcaster John Cargher.
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Tin Tin 2008: Senator Penny Wong (released 17 July 2008)
The star of this Tin Tin Index is Senator Penny Wong.
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Australian Gulag (released 7 June 2008)
The Australian rate of Indigenous imprisonment has risen from 1713 per 100,000 of population in 2000 to 2187 in 2007 a rise of 28 per cent. Since 2000, Indigenous imprisonment rates have risen a staggering 53 per cent in the Northern Territory, 49 per cent in South Australia, 34 per cent in Tasmania, 31 per cent in NSW, 28 per cent in Victoria, 27 per cent in Western Australia and 7 per cent in Queensland.
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